From WLEX: Infrastructure In Kentucky

Chad LaRueNews

Rep. Sal Santoro talks with WLEX about the significant need for increased transportation infrastructure funding to keep Kentucky from falling further behind.

From the Dayton Daily News: Ohio out of money for new road projects, prompting talk of gas tax hike

Chad LaRueNews

From the Dayton Daily News: By Laura A. Bischoff Richard Wilson, Columbus Bureau Within weeks, new Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and state lawmakers will face a huge challenge that impacts every Ohioan every day: how to come up with hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for road and bridge building and maintenance projects. Former governor John Kasich opted to issue $1.5 billion in bonds against future tolls collected by the Ohio Turnpike Commission to generate cash for construction projects. But that money, which started flowing in 2014, runs out later this year. Fix Our Roads Ohio, a broad-based coalition that includes chambers of commerce and local government groups, is making the case for increasing the state gas tax for … Read More

From WDRB: POV | Are Better Roads Worth an Extra Dime a Gallon?

Chad LaRueBlog, News

It is probably safe to say that no taxpayer is looking for more taxes to pay. It’s also safe to say that state roads, highways and bridges are not in as good shape as any of us would like. Lower gas prices and more fuel efficient vehicles have hurt the state road fund which gets a percentage of every gallon of gas sold. In a story on WDRB.com, Marcus Green and Sara Sidery, tell us the Kentucky State Legislature is now looking to increase the tax on gas by 10 cents a gallon. Just like you, I don’t like paying more taxes, but I also recognize that the road fairy isn’t coming to the rescue. We can either pay a … Read More

Impending Loss of Federal Toll Credits Makes Kentucky’s Transportation Funding Hole Even Deeper

Chad LaRueBlog, News

By Pam Thomas January 14, 2019 Over the past few years, there has been much discussion about the need for additional resources to support Kentucky’s crumbling transportation infrastructure. The funding hole that currently exists becomes even deeper at the end of fiscal year 2020 when the Transportation Cabinet estimates that all of Kentucky’s available federal toll credits – a resource the state has used to match and bring in federal transportation grant money – will be gone. A bill filed in the 2018 General Assembly provides a way forward. Current Resources Available to Support Kentucky’s Transportation Infrastructure Are Woefully Inadequate State funding for roads, bridges and other transportation infrastructure comes primarily from the Road Fund, which has suffered from declining … Read More

From River City News: Op-Ed: Airport Leaders Urge Kentucky Lawmakers to Focus on Infrastructure

Chad LaRueBlog, News

From the River City News: As leaders of Kentucky’s three largest commercial service airports, we understand that infrastructure investment is critical to our state’s continued economic success. Our airports are critical infrastructure assets to Kentucky, supporting more than 100,000 jobs and creating a $13 billion impact for the Commonwealth and the Louisville, Lexington, and Northern Kentucky regions. Growth will only continue if we appreciate the need to invest in airports, as well as provide funding for infrastructure that is in and around airports, such as highways, roads, and bridges. Infrastructure, and the ability it provides to connect locally and internationally, is a key driver for businesses that are considering to expand in or relocate to our state. Businesses make location … Read More

Partner Content: Shortage of truck drivers could mean delivery delays, empty shelves

Chad LaRueBlog, News

A January 2018 report from the American Trucking Association showed more than 70 percent of goods consumed in the U.S. are moved by truck. That’s a problem because there is a tremendous shortage of truck drivers in the U.S. – about 300,000, according to Bloomberg. Kentucky is feeling the pinch as well, and with more than 13,000 trucking companies in the Commonwealth, that means jobs are plentiful. Best of all, driving a commercial vehicle pays well. The Kentucky Trucking Association reports in 2016, total trucking industry wages paid in Kentucky exceeded $5 billion with an average annual trucking industry salary of $44,843. “Eighty-nine point two percent of Kentucky communities solely rely on trucking to deliver their goods,” Kentucky Trucking Association … Read More